Academic Hour: Cosmogony in State-Socialist Revolutions (well, at least in Cuba)

By Martin Holbraad from University College London.

16.10.2018 | Jon Bendixen

Dato ons 21 nov
Tid 13:00 15:00
Sted Lecture Hall (4206-139), Moesgaard Campus

This paper explores the nature of radical political change and its afterlife with reference to revolutionary politics in Cuba, and particularly the way in which ‘the revolution’ there has achieved the status of an encompassing condition or premise for people’s lives on the island. With reference to Roy Wagner’s distinction between the innate and the artificial, revolution may well appear as the apogee of the latter – this being the classic image of revolution as human beings taking the reins of their own destiny, making the future through their actions, building a better world for themselves, and so on. But how then does the artifice of such a human project get ‘implicated’, such that it begins to feature more as a ‘given’ in people’s everyday lives? To answer the question I connect the ethnography of revolution in Cuba today, almost 60 years after the radical events of 1959, to anthropological discussions of cosmogony, cosmology and their relationship to classic critiques of the distinction between nature and culture.

Seminar, Antropologi