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Research Unit for Robophilosophy

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The Research Unit for Robophilosophy (RUR) addresses research questions in social robotics that require expertise in various philosophical disciplines, including the new area of intercultural philosophy of technology.   Robophilosophy, which we have defined as "philosophy of, for, and by social robotics," is a new area of interdisciplinary and partly experimental philosophy that participates in, and facilitates, the integration of  empirical and normative research in the Humanities and Human sciences (anthropology, psychology, cognitive science, linguistics, phenomenology, ontology, knowledge representation, ethics) into social robotics research and engineering.

Social robotics is not only among the socially most relevant research areas for scholars in the Humanities, it also marks a new relationship between technology and the Humanities. The Research Unit for Robophilosophy undertakes targeted research projects (see http://www.robophilosophy.org) but also serves as a platform for research exchange--we coordinate the "Robophilosophy Conference Series" (www.robophilosophy-conference.org) and the Research Network for Transdisciplinary Studies in Social Robotics (TRANSOR).

Unit coordinator

Events Spring 2019

Please, contact Oliver Quick (osquick@cas.au.dk) for further information.

 

 

February 19th: Jens Christian Bjerring & Jacob Busch

Location: 1467-616

Time: 13-15

Artificial intelligence and patient-centered decision making: lifting the lid on black-box medicine

Advanced AI systems are rapidly making their way into medical research and practice, and, arguably, it is only a matter of time before they will surpass human practitioners in terms of accuracy, reliability, and knowledge. If this is true, practitioners will have a prima facie epistemic and professional obligation to align their medical verdicts with those of advanced AI systems. However, in light of their algorithmic complexity, these AI systems will often function as black boxes: the details of their contents, calculations, and procedures cannot be meaningfully understood by human practitioners. When AI algorithms reach this level of complexity, we can also speak of black-box medicine. In this paper, we want to argue that black-box medicine conflicts with core tenets of patient-centered medicine. In particular, we claim, black-box medicine does not allow practitioners to establish relationships with patients that are conducive for reaching a state of shared information, shared mind, and shared deliberation. On the contrary, black-box medicine is most naturally understood as promoting a return to a rather radical paternalistic conception of medicine; an approach that also does not sit well with core tenets of evidence-based medicine. 

March 7th: Holger Schultz, Univ. of Kobenhavn, Sound Lab,

Location: TBA

Time: 10-12

 

March 19th: Michael Cannon, “Relevance and Value Alignment in AI”

Location: 1467-616

Time: 13-15

(Student talk) April 2nd: Ida Marie Schytt Lassen, “Social Robots in Perspectives of Feminist Philosophy of Technology”

Location: 1467-616

Time: 13-15

April  11th:  Konstantin Koumaditis and Francesco Chinello, B-TECH, Aarhus University

Location: TBA

Time: 10-12

 

June 11th: Anne-Catherine Wackerhausen, Aarhus University, TBA

Location: 1467-616

Time: 13-15

 

June: Mark Bickhard, Univ of Lehigh, USA (precise date, location, and time tba)

Participants

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