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All Roads Lead to (Caesar’s Forum in) Rome

During the past two months, PhD Student Nikoline Sauer and Postdoc Sine Grove Saxkjær from the Caesar’s Forum Project have been on a research stay at the Danish Institute in Rome. To mark the end of their stay, they gave a guided tour in the Forum of Caesar for the benefit of the other residents at the Institute.

2020.10.28 | Mie Lind

Figure 1: The Forum of Caesar in Rome. Photo credits: Simon Cecchin Birk.

Figure 2: Sine G. Saxkjær gives an introduction to the Forum of Caesar and Julius Caesar in front of the Temple of Venus Genetrix. Photo credits: Simon Cecchin Birk.

Figure 3: Nikoline Sauer talks about her PhD project, which is based on the Archaic levels beneath the Forum of Caesar. Photo credits: Simon Cecchin Birk.

In September and October, the Danish Institute in Rome accommodated PhD Student Nikoline Sauer and Postdoc Sine Grove Saxkjær. The Institute serves as a stimulating research and study centre. The Institute’s research library, which covers areas within classical archaeology, philology and art history, provides an excellent basis to conduct research, while the many excursions to museums and sites inspires intellectually and culturally.

The Danish Institute is one of the main collaborators in the Caesar’s Forum Project. It was therefore an obvious choice to visit the Forum of Caesar on the Institute’s monthly excursion in October.

On Saturday 24 October, the day trip went to the Forum of Caesar in the centre of Rome (Fig. 1). The monumental ancient public space is situated on Via dei Fori Imperiali and is open to the public via the Museum of the Imperial Forum. Nikoline and Sine gave a joint presentation on the site for the other residents at the Institute. Sine gave an introduction to the Forum of Caesar, the Danish-Italian excavations, and the Roman general Julius Caesar (Fig.2). Nikoline then presented her PhD Project, which uses the archaic levels beneath the Forum of Caesar as point of departure. The dissertation studies Rome in the Archaic period, 6th-early 5th century BCE, which was a pivotal era in the early history of Rome (Fig. 3). 

Links and further information

Caesar’s Forum Project

For new book about Julius Caesar (in Danish) edited by Sine G. Saxkjær together with Trine A. Hass, see here.

For more on Nikoline Sauer’s PhD project, see here.

History and achaeology